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Saturday, April 25, 2020 | History

6 edition of Slavery, sugar, and the culture of refinement found in the catalog.

Slavery, sugar, and the culture of refinement

Kay Dian Kriz

Slavery, sugar, and the culture of refinement

picturing the British West Indies, 1700-1840

by Kay Dian Kriz

  • 52 Want to read
  • 31 Currently reading

Published by Yale University Press in New Haven .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Social classes in art,
  • Blacks in art,
  • Slavery in art,
  • Art, British -- 18th century,
  • Art, British -- 19th century,
  • West Indies, British -- In art

  • Edition Notes

    Includes bibliographical references and index.

    StatementKay Dian Kriz.
    GenreIn art.
    Classifications
    LC ClassificationsN8214.5.W38 K75 200
    The Physical Object
    Paginationp. cm.
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL18894673M
    ISBN 109780300140620
    LC Control Number2008011986


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Slavery, sugar, and the culture of refinement by Kay Dian Kriz Download PDF EPUB FB2

In a wide-ranging study of scientific illustrations, scenes of daily life, caricatures, and landscape imagery, Kay Dian Kriz analyzes the visual culture of refinement that accompanied the brutal process by which African slaves transformed “rude” sugar cane into pure white crystals.

Slavery, Sugar, and the Culture of Refinement (Paul Mellon Centre for Studies in British Art) [Kriz, Kay Dian] on *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers.

Slavery, Sugar, and the Culture of Refinement (Paul Mellon Centre for Studies in British Art)Cited by: Slavery, Sugar, and the Culture of Refinement: Picturing the British West Indies, Kay Dian Kriz Brown University Slavery Petley University of Southampton, @ Follow this and additional works at: This Book Reviews is brought to you for free and open access by [email protected] Amherst.

Slavery, Sugar, and the Culture of Refinement by Kay Dian Kriz,available at Book Depository with free delivery worldwide/5(5). Title of a book, article or other published item (this will display to the public): Slavery, sugar, and the culture of refinement: picturing the British West Indies, ISBN of the winning item.

Get this from a library. Slavery, sugar, and the culture of refinement: picturing the British West Indies, [Kay Dian Kriz; Paul Mellon Centre for Studies in British Art.] -- "This book asks new questions about paintings and prints associated with the British West Indies between andwhen the trade in sugar and slaves was the most active and profitable.

The cover of Slavery, sugar and the culture of refinement: Picturing the British West Indies, () Kay Dian Kriz (born ) is professor emerita of. But to the contrary, Slavery and the Culture of Taste demonstrates that these two areas of modernity were surprisingly entwined.

Ranging across Britain, the antebellum South, and the West Indies, and examining vast archives, including portraits, period paintings, personal narratives, and diaries, Simon Gikandi illustrates how the violence and. Slavery, Sugar, and the Culture of Refinement: Picturing the British West Indies, Paul Mellon Centre for Studies in British Art.

New Haven, Yale University Press, Illustrations. pp., $ (cloth), ISBN Reviewed for H-Caribbean by Christer Petley Visual Cultures and Representation of the British Caribbean. Kay Dian Kriz Slavery, Sugar, and the Culture of Refinement: Picturing the British West Indies, – New Haven and London: Yale University Press in association with Paul Mellon Centre for Studies in British Art, pp.; 40 color ills.; 80 b/w ills.

Cloth $ (). Sugar and Slaves: The Rise of the Planter Class in the English West Indies, (Published by the Omohundro Institute of Early American History and the University of North Carolina Press) [Dunn, Richard S.] on *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers.

Sugar and Slaves: The Rise of the Planter Class in the English West Indies, (Published Cited by: picturing culture Download picturing culture or read online books in PDF, EPUB, Tuebl, and Mobi Format.

Slavery Sugar And The Culture Of Refinement. Author by: Kay Dian Kriz and mobile phones are central to people’s engagement with physical culture today.

The book demonstrates how the visual creates dynamic pedagogical tools for. [] Includes bibliographical references and index. Slavery, Sugar, and the Culture of Refinement (Paul Mellon Centre for Studies in British Art) by Kay Dian Kriz ISBN ISBN   Deborah Cullen is Director of Curatorial Programs at El Museo del Barrio, New o Saborit is Investigador de la Direccion de Estudios Historicos, at the Instituto Nacional de Antropologia e Historia, ine Manthorne is Professor of Art of the United States, Latin America, and Their Cross-Currents, – at the Graduate Center of City.

Sugar was the main crop produced on plantations throughout the Caribbean in the 18th, 19th, and 20th centuries. Most islands were covered with sugar cane fields, and mills for refining main source of labor, until the abolition of chattel slavery, was enslaved the abolition of slavery, indentured laborers from India, China, and Java migrated to the Caribbean to mostly.

Sugar, or White Gold, as British colonists called it, was the engine of the slave trade that brought millions of Africans to the Americas beginning in the early : Heather Whipps.

Five chapters focus on scientific illustration, images of free mixed-race women, humor and print culture, scenes of everyday life, and landscape painting through the lens of slavery, sugar production, and the creation of a culture of refinement in the British West Indies.

Includes forty color and eighty black-and-white illustrations. Kay Dian Kriz, Slavery, Sugar, and the Culture of Refinement (New Haven, Yale University Press, ) and Geoff Quilley, ‘Pastoral plantations: the slave trade and the representation of British colonial landscape in the late eighteenth century,’ in Geoff Quilley and Kay Dian Kriz (Eds) An Economy of Colour: Visual Culture and the Atlantic.

Slavery, sugar, and the culture of refinement: picturing the British West Indies, Pages Add to My Bookmarks Export citation. Type Book Author(s) Kay Dian Kriz Date Publisher Yale University Press Pub place New Haven ISBN ISBN Digitisation.

Sugar and Slavery: An Economic History of the British West Indies, Richard B. Sheridan User Review - tobagotim - LibraryThing. This book covers the changing preference of growing sugar rather than tobacco which had been the leading crop in the trans-Atlantic colonies. The Sugar Islands were Antigua, Barbados, St.

Christopher. His last book exemplifies such an effort. The country of which Rodney wrote began as three Dutch sugar plantation districts and only officially became Britain's Guiana colony in.

Book on Amazon. Felicity Nussbaum, Torrid Zones: Maternity, Sexuality and Empire in Eighteenth-Century English Narratives.

Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, Book on Amazon; Kay Dian Kriz, Slavery, Sugar and the Culture of Refinement. Picturing the British West-Indies, New Haven: Yale University Press: Published for the.

Slave religion and culture. In much the same way they viewed slave marriage, planters also saw religion as a means of controlling their slaves, and they encouraged it.

Slaves, in a prayer house built on the plantation or at services in their master's nearby church, heard time and again a simple sermon—obey your master and do not steal or lie.

Sugar Changed the World by Marc Aronson and Marina Budhos firmly establishes the immutable influence which sugar has imposed on the world. The core component in the history of slavery and human rights worldwide sugar has left behind it a trail of blood unequaled by any product, including cotton/5.

As much social history as art book, Slavery, Sugar, and the Culture of Refinement: Picturing the British West Indies is one of the latest releases in the Paul Mellon Centre for Studies in British Art Series and, as its title suggests, explores the knotty relationships between slavery and “culture”.

Scholarly and topically informative. Indeed, throughout Sugar, Slavery, and the Culture of Refinement, Kriz provides valuable, and overdue, analysis of pro-colonial and proslavery culture both before and after the rise of organized abolitionism.

This helps to ensure that the book not only broadens our appreciation of the importance of visual culture to metropolitan understandings. Slavery & Abolition. A Journal of Slave and Post-Slave Studies.

Search in: Advanced search Slavery, Sugar, and the Culture of Refinement: Picturing the British West Indies, – Beth Fowkes Tobin. Sugar, Slavery, and Plantation Agriculture in Early Barbados. Nuala Zahedieh.

"[This] elegantly written book is easily the finest on the subject and a major addition to colonial scholarship."-- Journal of Economic History "[Features] lively and well-informed discussions of the West Indian economy, society, culture, and political organization in the seventeenth century."--Elsa V.

Goveia, William and Mary Quarterly. "A Subtlety, or the Marvelous Sugar Baby" sugar sculpture by Kara Walker at the Domino Sugar Factory in Brooklyn, New York (detail from larger photo) When we describe and think of sugar, it is a w.

The only thing I can hold against this book is the title "Slave Culture", which implies that the slave status itself created a culture which was crucial in the context of the subject of the book.

In the text of the book however, it is shown that the links to various African cultures and African cultural heritage which was the crucial factors in /5. Kay Dian Kriz. Slavery, Sugar, and the Culture of Refinement: Picturing the British West Indies, New Haven, CT, and London: Yale University Press, Pp.

ix+ $ (cloth). Although located within the discipline of art history, this book engages with the varied. It would be easy to assume that, in the eighteenth century, slavery and the culture of taste--the world of politeness, manners, and aesthetics--existed as separate and unequal domains, unrelated in the spheres of social life.

But to the contrary, Slavery and the Culture of Taste demonstrates that these two areas of modernity were surprisingly entwined. Ranging across. From its origins in manorial sharecropping on Española, through the consolidation of the sugar-slavery nexus in Brazil, to its refinement in the form of the integrated slave plantation in Barbados, through the spread of that plantation type in the Caribbean, to the industrial climax of colonial sugar manufacturing in Cuba, the machinery of Cited by: 1.

David Brion Davis, The Problem of Slavery in Western Culture (Ithaca, New York: Cornell University Press, ). PART ONE: 1. The Historical Problem: Slavery and the Meaning of America. This chapter opens by pointing out a fundamental contradiction in early American values that prized liberty yet perpetuated slavery.

But to the contrary, Slavery and the Culture of Taste demonstrates that these two areas of modernity were surprisingly entwined. Ranging across Britain, the antebellum South, and the West Indies, and examining vast archives, including portraits, period paintings, personal narratives, and diaries, Simon Gikandi illustrates how the violence and Brand: Princeton University Press.

Culture and the Atlantic World, (), and Kay Dian Kriz's Slavery, Sugar, and the Culture of Refinement: Picturing the British West Indies, (). Slave Portraiture pushes the scholarship in the above foundational books further.

Digital History ID Through their families, religion, folklore, and music, as well as more direct forms of resistance, Africans-Americans resisted the debilitating effects of slavery and created a vital culture supportive of human dignity.

In addition, slaves exerted a profound influence on all aspects of American culture. Beyond Massa: Sugar Management in the British Caribbean by John F.

Campbell Words | 5 Pages. In the book Beyond Massa: Sugar Management in the British Caribbean,by John F. Campbell, it’s main focus encompasses and revolves around issues surrounding slavery practices by using Golden Grove estate in Jamaica as a primary source during the.

Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, Book on Amazon; Kay Dian Kriz, Slavery, Sugar and the Culture of Refinement.

Picturing the British West-Indies, New Haven: Yale University Press: Published for the Paul Mellon Centre for Studies in British Art. Book. Keyser • The Sweet Tooth of Slavery The Sweet Tooth of Slavery Django Unchained and Kara Walker’s A Subtlety Catherine Keyser This past spring and summer, in an installation by artist Kara Walker, a sugarcoated sphinx gazed upon visitors with a blank and inscrutable stare in the defunct Domino Sugar Factory in Brooklyn.

At the en. Slavery - Slavery - Slave culture: The institution of slavery usually tried to deny its victims their native cultural identity.

Torn out of their own cultural milieus, they were expected to abandon their heritage and to adopt at least part of their enslavers’ culture.

Nonetheless, studies have shown that there were aspects of slave culture that differed from the master culture.How Sugar Became Crucial. Even in the early ’s, there were many people who opposed the practice of slavery in the eighteenth century on the sugar plantation. However, the advent of the eighteenth century was also a transformative time for one of the central agricultural products of the Enlightenment era: sugar.A summary of the book.

The narration begins inwhen the English took control of the tiny island of St. Christopher. From that lonely outpost emerged a “cohesive and potent master class” of tobacco and sugar planters that spread to Barbados, Nevis, Montserrat, Antigua, and Jamaica.